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and a hat for 38 bucks. >> add a cup of coffee and a hot dog. >> while we use the word trousers, bob pisani is here watching what's good morning, bob. >> happy monday, everybody. did you notice the market. nice rally here. again, the market is demonstrated that it believes a deal on the fiscal cliff is coming. i know. i didn't hear it over the weekend. headline risk was all anybody wanted to talk about on friday. if anybody says that a deal is not happening or it's going nowhere, we could wake up down 15 points on the s&p on monday. guess what? boehner said the deal is going nowhere. now, when i call the bulls on this, they say, bob, they didn't say a deal was off. they just said so far the negotiations are going nowhere. the market still believes that a deal is coming and it's going to be a substantive deal. instead and by the way, geithner insisted on tax rates issues. looks like there may be something happening eventually. we didn't fall apart on the whole thing. even futures weren't down overnight. instead we rally on a little bit overnight on the greek deal and for those that don't kno
with you later in the program. >>> for now, we're joined by bob parker on set, senior adviser at credit suisse. bob, welcome. >> thank you. >> what do you make of this? is there any way that this is a positive in terms of perhaps opening the door towards mon at the monte serving in some sort of government? >>. >> i am assuming we're going to have a election probably in the second half of january. we're talking about a position of somewhere between 12 and 17% of the vote. so subsequently, i think fears that berlusconi may come back seem to be misplaced. i think if everyone looks at the last year and a half of what the monte government has achieved in italy, you have to be impressed. we have a strong budget climate surplus. the overall budget has come in dramatically. we've had well fare reform, pension reform. there's further work to be done on the competitiveness of italy. >> i can't tell you how much investors have been talking bullishly about italy. we know it's the eurozone's third biggest economy. obviously what happens in italy is important. they've been saying if anything the prob
. representative howard berman elected in 1982 and served 30 years from the 28th district. representative bob filner sworn in this month as mayor of san diego and served for 20 years. representative laura richardson served for five years from the 37th district. representative pete stark, outgoing dean of our delegation was elected in 1972 and served more than 40 wreers from the 13th district. representative lynn woolsey served for 20 years from the 6th congressional district. much kk said about the distinguished careers of our departing colleagues, but i would like to offer a few remarks of the work i have joined them during their time here in the congress. representative howard berman has served the house for 30 years and i was honored to name him among my closest friends in this body. during his service, he worked on a wide of variety of issues and known as a champion of human rights and standing up for middle class, working class and for the poor in our country. as chair of the foreign affairs committee from 2007 to 2008, mr. berman made great progress on behalf of the less fortunate. he w
bob moffett t chairman of both companies, mmr, owns a stake in pxp, board seats. it's related. >> and yet, ackerson, did we get hold of him? he's always been very pro shareholder. this is the most anti-shareholder. unless you're a very large shareholder. >> isn't he cynical? >> these guys are different, moffett and our man in chesapeake. >> thank you. they approach the world a little different. >> is it different from you? you're fitzgerald. >> i don't want to say cavalier, but they like to take risks, that's how they built their fortune in the first police, they all take risks. >> i thought if you bought freeport, you were trying to play the grassberg, big copper, the china thing, i didn't know i was getting involved in a high stakes poker match. >> yes. which is why you're selling. >> let's get to bob pisani who's on the floor watch what's moving. >> moffett wants the cash flow from freeport who helped finance the drilling for mcmoran drilling. why did they have to spend 70% premium to buy these things? if i wanted to buy them, i could have bought them a lot cheaper, i wante
, bob, it's a fantasy. all of this goldilocks stuff is a fantasy. you cannot get strong growth with rising taxes and lower spending. that's not going to happen. you cannot have unlimited stimulus that is not going to cause inflation. that's just a fantasy. so there's a real fight going on. none the less, have you noticed, gold being sold, buying the euro, it seems a weird trade going on here affecting the markets. this was going on yesterday as well. this may have to do with the yen. the yen is hitting new lows against the dollar. it's hitting new lows against the euro. have you seen what's going on with the japanese elections? the new prime minister told the bank of japan we want more stimulus. guess who's meeting thursday? the bank of japan. japan's exports fall for the sixth straight month. you are going to see the bank of japan on thursday announce new stimulus measures. you're going to see efforts to weaken the yen. it's going to get even weaker. that is the old yen carry trade. that may be where some of this money is coming from to do the odd little trades that seem to be
the problems here, the father of the -- [inaudible] then like bob lovett and david bruce, smart guys. you've got a problem. and he says, you know, and you to get rid of dulles, allen does. his brother, john foster dulles, sector essay, a little harder to fire him, but more importantly, ike said it takes a strange kind of genius to run an intelligence service. and he's right about that. and allen dulles did have a strange kind of genius. so ike was reluctant to get rid of them. so he did. i think he regretted. susan's dad told me after the u2 got shut down he went to his father on the plane, the paris summit about to collapse her some, and said to him, dad, you should have fired back i. and ike blew up and basically said i'm the president and you're not. but it was little defensive about it because, yeah, he probably should have. these things are always clear in retrospect than they are at the time. ike was a great manager but he was arguably a little slow to get rid of people. he had no problem with sacking generals in world war ii, but maybe a little slow in his own administration in his
. let me introduce myself, i'm bob oakes from morning edition on wbur, boston's npr news station. [applause] thank you. thank you. i'm sure some of you are saying, wow, that's bob oakes? [laughter] i thought he was taller -- [laughter] i thought he was thinner, i thought he had more hair. [laughter] and, you know, the funny thing is that all those things were true last week. [laughter] let me thank all of you for coming here this afternoon and thank the boston book festival for having us. don't they do a nice job? isn't this a terrific eventsome. >> yes. [applause] >> let's also thank the plymouth rock foundation for sponsoring this particular session and say that without their generosity, it would be hard to put on events like this that add to the cultural life that we all enjoy in this great city. so so thanks to them. [applause] and in a way that's what we're here to talk about this afternoon, the triumph of this city and all the cities, the triumph of the city, that's the title of harvard economics professor ed glaeser's book. it's about what's made cities around the world gr
and try to close this deal. >> bob or jimmy, will the house pass it? >> i think the house will pass it. the whip count is reportedly very close just on capitol hill. i think bainler get it passed and that puts the pressure on the senate and the president to come up with an appropriate response. >> it's weird, jimmy. they call it farsicle. nancy pelosi loved the idea for a while. i guess your idea is it doesn't have any spending cuts the president all along has been saying we need to make sure the middle class gets a tax hike. none of the middle class gets a tax hikend plan b. why is it such a farce? >> under what will be passed tomorrow, there is a middle class tax increase. the eic is taken out -- >> we're talking about marginal rates. gentlemen, gentlemen, these are facts. what is in that bill that boehner will send to the floor tomorrow, those tax credits are not in it. the point is john boehner is making his entire caucus walk the plank on the issue on whether or not millionaires and below don't have to pay any more taxes than anybody else. >> you say they're walking the plank. >>
, bob. we did. got it. >>> if you notice unusual trades happening today, it might be because of those gentlemen. >> and ladies. >> they'll ring the opening bell. >> we'll tell you more about that in a couple of minutes. in the meantime -- >> they are gentlemen. >> in the meantime, the president is in hawaii on vacation. washington lawmakers are on holiday. there's still no deal to avoid the fiscal cliff. the deadline is a week away. hampton pearson is in washington on the stalemate. >> as early as the day after christmas, congress and the white house will have to start to deal with what president obama called the real consequences of going over that fiscal cliff. >> nobody can get 100% of what they want. and this is not simply a contest between parties in terms of who looks good and who doesn't. there are real world consequences to what we do here. >> a short-term deal won't just focus on tax rates. the end of the payroll tax cut and the impact of the hike in the minimum tax on january 1st. over the weekend, we did hear from some republican moderates who say it may in fact be time to
interesting conversations over the weekend was bob corker saying, let's just go ahead, concede to the tax argument, which would flip the entire spotlight onto entitlements, which is what republicans have been trying to get the discussion to be about over the last couple of weeks. >> when you hear about entitlements, why aren't they talking directly, you know, medicare part b koshcosts x, or medicare a, should cost this. the last thing a republican wants to do is say, look, i'm cutting back medicare. so, i mean, if you switch it to entitlements, suddenly everyone has to say, social security goes from 66 to 68. is that what we do? do we means test medicare? it is so much easier for grover who will be on cnbc, forget the fiscal cliff, i will come after you with both barrels. if you vote tax increase. what's more -- do they want to rise above a tax increase? no. do they want to rise above fiscal cliff? no. what they want it do is not rise above the radar screen of raising taxes. and grover is more powerful than a recession. i asked him point-blank on "meet the press," college chum, look, it d
, the fed meeting. what are the proceed right now? >> we've got bob from s&p capital iq. steven wood and gordon shallop. great to have you all on the show. you normally get the priority of speaking first. what are you doing right now? >> right now we're anticipating for volatility. we knew it was going to be a volatile fourth quarter. there's a lot of policy induced volatility. that said, the economy in the united states has not changed that much. it's grinding along. that recovery we've been talking about for a long time. so it's measurably positive, not robustly positive. that's kind of doing battle with just about offsetting some of the policy risk. >> the fear is all that changes if we go over the cliff. >> it would. right now the forecast is there's some compromise. there's a short-term compromise. they buy time. and they use that to get the silhouette of a grand bargain. if they use the time well, the markets could like that. if we do go off the cliff, that's 8% of gdp. >> what's your expectation, bob? >> we put out a research saying the fiscal cliff was going to consume invest
president, and like bob lovett, david bruce, smart guys, warn him, you got a problem here, and he says, you know, and you ought to get rid of dallace. he's the brother of john foster, secretary of state, but more important, really, he says it takes a strange kind of genius to run and intelligence service, and he's right about that, and allen did have a strange genius so ike was reluctant to get rid of them, begs to question to replace with whom? he did. i think he regretted it. john eisenhower told me that after the u2 was shot down, he went to his father on the plane to the paris summit about to collapse, the paris summit, and said to him, dad, you should have fired that guy, and ike blew up and basically said i'm the president of the united states, but it was a little defensive about it because, you know, he probably should have gotten rid of dulles. they are clearer in retrospect than they are at the time. ike was a great manager, but he was arguably a little slow to get rid of people. i think not in world war ii, no problem with sacking generals in world war ii, but maybe a little slow
toss it to bob. bank of america continues its tear up 1.75% new 52-week high in today's session of 1064. on our radar this morning. let's send it over to bob with more on what's moving. >> happy friday. what a week. futures popped ten points on the jobs report even though october was revised downward rather notably. a good open. materials, techs, financials leading the way. i wish i could be more optimistic on the fiscal cliff. a gloomy commentary this morning. expectations are getting narrow. grand bargains are out and the idea of maybe the fallback position is pass a simple tax bill like the one the senate had. the simple bill here. you have tax cuts for middle class but not for people over 250,000. you have dividends and capital gains going to 23.8%. that's the senate bill. and that's it. you leave out estate tax and leave out payroll tax cut and unemployment extension and you leave that out. no delay in the sequestration. this is pretty thin gruel. this is what's tossed about and talked about today overall. is that enough to satisfy the markets? remember, the two requirements, got t
here. people feel like it really keeps netflix in the game. >> we want to get a little more from bob, who is in the crowd, where berkshire has halted for news pending at this point. bob, there's been talk that berkshire quietly acoming a big stake in avida. that's now 13%. maybe it has other intentions in terms of ownership with that company. >> significant speculation just from what the news pending is. we don't know what it is. but i want to note, melissa, berkshire class a and class b shares are both halted news pending. the crowd is just sort of standing around here with orders to buy or sell, waiting to find out exactly what the news is going to be. you'll notice we're up again today. the sixth day in a row the dow industrials are up. optimism on the fiscal cliff being resolved. i'll tell you this, somebody's very wrong about 2013, because there's two camps that are quite at odds with each other right now. the first one i've been telling you about, it's been quat bearish on this. that the fiscal cliff will be a headwind for stocks. that this represents the start of a new america
, craig cook from the university of cincinnati. i remember those guys. i loved them. bob trumping, chris collinsworth. john harwood, thank you. and i was happening that rg3, no real damage, hopefully. comments, questions on anything you see here on squawk, e-mail us, squawk@cnbc.com. >>> still to come, one of the most cited voices since the fiscal cliff, erskine bowles. he he loves the rise above. first, we're going to head to the futures pits in chicago and see which stories are most likely to drive today's trading. as we head to break, some of santa's friends dawned swimsuits this weekend to take part in the santa claus run in budapest, hungary. they did their best to keep moving in below freezing temperatures. to the best vacation spot on earth. (all) the gulf! it doesn't matter which of our great states folks visit. mississippi, alabama, louisiana or florida, they're gonna love it. shaul, your alabama hospitality is incredible. thanks, karen. love your mississippi outdoors. i vote for your florida beaches, dawn. bill, this louisiana seafood is delicious. we're having such a great yea
away. we miss him. >> rest in peace. >>> let's check in with bob on that note. hey, bob. >> china. finally something from the leadership. we have been waiting for weeks, months, remember, everyone has been waiting for them to try to find where their desks are and find out where they can live and where they can stay and sit down and get used to the furniture and look around and say what are we going to do with the economy. we've been waiting no comment. we got comment from the party chief who made a speech in beijing and talked about what was going on. he used words like expanding domestic demand. used words like supporting urbanization. this is what everyone wanted to hear. those are buzz words. those are code words for stimulus. that's what the market is reacting to today. 2% move up in china in shanghai and even hong kong stocks. they moved together. this hasn't happened in a long, long time here. the bottom line is we're finally starting to hear from the leadership. they found their offices and things are starting to move and that is certainly very, very good news because now t
?margin. don't be modest, bob. you found a better way to pack a bowling ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the gift of all day pain relief. this season, discover aleve. all day pain relief with just two pills. with odor free aspercreme. powerful medicine relieves pain fast, with no odor. so all you notice is relief. aspercreme. . >>> as promised let's take a look at the rest of the top ten most intriguing people you selected for 2012. here's again, brooke baldwin. >> reporter: number five, super jumper felix baumgartner. let's face it, he did what no human has ever done, diving 24 miles from the edge of space. >> under way. >> breaking the sound barrier along the way. >> i'm still the same guy. but as soon as you start traveling p
thompson. she's in for bob this morning. >> the dow is down 54 points. now just down about 34. the market is expected to move in tandem with any headlines across from washington. right now, we don't have the deal, not really a problem for the markets. of course, that could change as we head toward the close and the uncertainty builds. quick check of the european boards today. most of them were closed. those who did trade, i should say, were only traded a half day. the session there was mixed. the concerns over there continue to be will the u.s. go over the fiscal cliff. that kept pressure on some of the indices there. we're keeping watch on the bank stocks right now. we've seen a dourn-around in those there. futures popped earlier half an hour before the open. they have opened broadly to the down side in today's session. you guys were talking about it earlier, another positive reading on the pmi out of china. that seems to be lending some support to the material stocks in today's session, as you take a look at the shanghai composite, which is closing at a six-month high, or closed the new
in the party and certainly from the right. >> reporter: no doubt about it. bob corker from tennessee was on "fox news sunday" yesterday. he gave fo voice to something you're hearing from an increasing number of republicans right now which is maybe they should give in on raising taxes on the rich in order to fight it out and try to get more leverage in terms of spending cuts. take a listen. >> once you give him the rate on the top 2%, it's actually a much lesser tax increase than what's he's been talking about. the focus then shifts to entitlements. >> reporter: now, the key, though, as we've all been talking about this end of the year deadline, december 31st, but in fact, when you talk to leaders in both parties, they realize the real deadline is probably the end of this week in terms of at least getting a framework of a deal so that then both the house expht senat and e can work on the details and pass this thing. they've got to get moving now, this week, if they're going to get this done by the end of the year. >> shepard: ed, thank you. the president commented today on the battle
a plant in chattanooga a few months ago, 2,000 new jobs. bob corcoran was down there. 2,000 jobs, every one of which started at $14.50 an hour. >> right. they're not all going to be at -- >> so volkswagen was moving these jobs here because we're the low wage country compared to germany. >> dude, are you suggesting we push these jobs away? >> i'm not. >> i would rather americans have a shot at a $17 an hour job than having it in china. >> i agree. >> find a way to do better. i actually agree with you. but you have to understand the consequences are pretty severe for american lifestyles. >> again, though, i'm sorry, mike, but the consequences are, we have two choices, we can't get 1965 wages, we either have these jobs in china or lexington, either have them in alabama or germany and this is at least for some of -- a chance for younger americans to get some good jobs. >> joe, if you're taking a job that pays $14.50 an hour. it means one of two things, a, you don't have a job so you're getting a job or b, you're taking a job that's higher paying job. come on, this is good news! 1 $14. $14.5
warriors and the chamber of commerce and john kerry and bob dole. it was voted down including five key votes from friends and colleagues of bob dole. it was all over what the senate foreign relations committee -- the hearings indicated the black helicopters were not coming. this was not some crazy requirement on america. we already have the standard. it was that 26 other countries have ratified this. it went down. i am still trying to understand the opposition. >> would you think? >> i think it is fear. it is not based on fact or reality. someone is able to hype this notion we are agreeing to a one world government by ratified this treaty which simply embodies what has been our law for decades. the chamber endorsed it. but there is this year. -- but there is this fear of the government and being required to be accountable for having health insurance, the so-called mandate, even though there is help if you need it. >> the velocity of information through social media, radio, and tv, there is a lot of false information and it gets amplified so rapidly now. it is very hard for the facts to
.n. disability treaty right in front of bob dole. that was just a bizarre moment, if you will. this fiscal cliff. three budget standoffs. i mean, this congress has been uniquely atrocious. >> tom? >> the fact is the system is rigged. 75% of the congressmen come from gerrymandered districts in which they are bulletproof. they only play to one constituency. they are not swing states. they have a choir back home. and that's a huge part of the problem here. there's another reality in this town today. we need a lighter moment here. a lot of folks as i was coming into the office today said they have to get it done by kickoff time tonight. >> that's right. >> it's a good thing nbc moved the kickoff to primetime. it's very important. >> david, i think it's also important to go back to the president's argument, that, you know, you have to be able to say yes to something that's reasonable. conservatives have argued that he's effectively exposed big internal divisions in the republican party that they have yet to work out, which prevents them from getting to a reasonable place of compromise to then move on
, that was you and me and we were driving bob michael and president bush nuts when the democrats were offering them, give us the tax increases now, we'll give you the spending cuts later and we were saying, oh, no, they'll never keep their word on the spending cuts. they'll tax the tax increases. quite frankly, the speaker has a difficult role to play here. he's seen by so many people as the principal guardian of our liberty and of sound economic policy within the context of the majority senate that frankly just think it's good for the country for the government to be bigger. the government is counterproductive to the performance of the rest of the world. >> thank you for coming on. >> i would respectfully suggest that the government is grown too big, promised too much and waited to long to restructure, but it's not too late. and i would also respectfully suggest that both political parties are responsible for that. >> absolutely right. >> we need comprehensive tax reform. and what i'm concerned about is that we're not differentiating between this fiscal cliff, it's the symptom, and the diseas
. >> ticker would be scas, by the way. >> for seaworld? >> yes. yes. yes. check with mary thompson in for bob pisani this morning. hey, mary. >> we note mixed market the dow up 7 1/2 points, continued weakness in the s & p as well as the nasdaq today, lower by semiconductors, strength in the energy sector around drug stocks in early trade. that is helping to support the dow. a number of traders say the market continues to hold up pretty well, given that there are, of course, fewer expectation wers going to reach, a grand bargain on avoiding the fiscal cliff. look at the s & p, we did have melissa mentioning this earlier, down three days in a role one strategist pointing out technically looks vulnerable, the 15-day moving average above the 200 day. if it breaks below that, we could see selling pressure heading to the end of the year. the vix which popped up earlier, this is a measure of fear on wall street. i bring this up, while we are at the highest levels in six months on the vix, well below half of where we were back in august of 2011, the debt crisis. that kind of suggests again a complac
hemisphere. i worked with some of my cuban- ileanaan friends, ke ros-lehtinen and bob menendez and we worked hard to put sanctions on castro to try to bring that regime down. it was not until the soviet mig that was shot down, they shot a couple of them down. one of them made it back. that created a huge for error -- furor. bill clinton was put in a difficult position. i was the author in the house and the jesse helms was the author in the senate and we worked together on the bill along with my cuban-american brands. >> that regime is still around. at the time, a number of our allies protested the bill. in the rearview mirror, how effective was it overall? do you feel good about that? >> it shows the repression is so strong in cuba, the ability of fidel castro to reach out to some of his "friends" around the world that he has been able to circumvent sanctions. i think we ought to do everything we can to bring freedom to the people of cuba. the helms-burton law was not as effective as i would have liked. >> another issue out you are associated with is autism. how did that get started? >> my g
can can. >> yes, bob british medical journal. most has been about the impact on the federal budget and balancing one pocket versus another. what analysis has been done on say on the exchanges on the complicate of the employability of seniors if an employer has to carry these additional costs for an extended period of time? my high hypothesis would be may would make them less employable in some ways, either that or hasten the flight away from employers even providing insurance. on the consumer side how would these increase cost effect access to care and probably qlt of care? >> paul, you want to start? >> sure. on your first question, i have actually not heard anyone or any of the studies suggest extending medicare eligibility age might hasten the point where employers might not have coverage at all. what i was trying to add earlier a majority outside of the industries where retire -- the effect of the age would be that at the margin there will be some employees that would continue in the work force longer because the subsidize they were seeing from the employer for health insurance
communicators." >> we just saw pennsylvania senator bob casey. >> the committee will come to order. we want to thank everyone for being here today. i did not have a chance to personally greet our witnesses, but i will have time to do that later. i want to thank both of our witnesses for being here. i will have an opening statement that i will make, and then i will turn it to dr. burgess. i know that vice chairman brady will be her as well. we know the challenges that we confront here in congress on a whole range of issues, which are sometimes broadly described under the umbrella of the terminology, fiscal cliff. when we confront those difficult challenges, we have to ask ourselves a couple of basic questions. one of the basic questions we must ask is, what will be the result and will be the impact as it relates to middle income families? what will happen to them in the midst of all these tough issues we have to work out? we know there is broad agreement that going over the so-called fiscal cliff would jeopardize the economic recovery. it would do that by increasing taxes on families, haltin
to the mid 30s. bob dole in the midst of the anti-immigrant sentiment of the 1990s took it back below 30. george w. bush got it back up to the magic 40% that karl rove thought was the jumping off point for neutralizing all of these questions. so, you know, we're talking about a fairly small margin of voters here. so, if you -- you know, a 10% shift in the latino votes moving 1 million to 1.3 million, you know, the actual -- what the turnout is, we don't really know yet. it's going to take a while. the exit poll numbers are losing credibility as time goes on, but that's -- i don't want to get too -- >> yes. >> you know, geeky with you [laughter] a shift to a million voters, million and a half voters, and romney would have been in the mid 30s in terms of his share, and everybody would have said, "that was a pretty good night for a republican." now, what would have happened in terms of actual states, i knew you were going to ask that -- [laughter] >> and then i want to go down the row, getting everyone. >> it's interesting, because it doesn't -- it would have -- i'll leave it to the pundits
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